Photography Beyond Technique

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I first met Tom Persinger when I spoke at the F295 Symposium back in 2008 and I’m really honoured that he asked me to be a contributor to his new book Photography Beyond Technique.

You can pre-order the book on Amazon now for shipping after January 21st.

Photography Beyond Technique — Essays from F295 on the Informed Use of Alternative and Historical Photographic Processes

Edited by Tom Persinger.

Photography is not dying and has not died. In fact, it is more vigorous than ever. It has been an ever-changing medium since its earliest days, and while near-obsession with the technology of the day may have defined photography over the course of its existence, photography is much more than hardware and software. Photography is communication, whether chemical or digital, tangible or ephemeral in form.

Photography Beyond Technique is a compelling selection of essays and images culled from the many excellent presentations given at the ten F295 events that reveal the thoughts and methods of some of today’s most exciting contemporary photographers.

These artists employ alternative, historical, or handmade processes and techniques, and share a comprehensive view of the medium: that the choice of photographic process is just as important as the decisions of content and subject. While other books concentrate solely on process, or theory, or artistic intent, none focus on photography in which these decisions are considered inseparable.

The book includes the following contributors and essays:

• Jo Babcock – One Thousand Invented Cameras
• Craig Barber – Memory, Nature, and Place
• Stephen Berkman – That Obscura Object of Desire: A Brief History
• Laura Blacklow – Imprecise Evidence
• Dan Burkholder – There is No Virtue in Difficulty
• Martha Casanave – Mystery, Memory, and Narrative
• Jill Enfield – Something Extraordinary
• Dan Estabrook – Notes on the Art of Failure
• Jesseca Ferguson – The Photograph as Reliquary
• Alan Greene – Imaginary Whole Plates or, Notes Towards the Reinvention of Photography
• James Hajicek & Carol Panaro-Smith – The Evolution of a Collaboration
• Robert Hirsch – Looking Backward, Seeing Forward: Reframing Visual History
• Robb Kendrick – There is No Command-Z
• John Metoyer – Synthesizing Centuries
• France Scully Osterman – Sleep
• Mark Osterman – Finding Confidence: Combining Process with Purpose
• Tom Persinger – Windows
• Jerry Spagnoli – Photograph, Material, and Metaphor
• Brian Taylor – The Art of Getting Lost
• Keith Taylor – In the Dark, Time Feels Different than When it is Light