FlakPhoto Midwest Print Show

Madison, Wisconsin is going to be the place to be in the Midwest in the coming next few weeks, it seems. Not only is the SPE (Society of Photographic Educators) Midwest Conference being held there but there’s also the Wisconsin Book Festival and the FlakPhoto Midwest Print Show, curated by Andy Adams of FlakPhoto. I’m very grateful to Andy for selecting one of my platinum prints for inclusion in the show which showcases the work of 42 photographers from 9 states.

There will be plenty of photography in Madison with shows at the MMoCA, the Madison BUBBLER Gallery, the James Watrous Gallery, and at Overture Center for the Arts. The FlakPhoto show will be held at the Diane Endres Ballweg Gallery at the Central Library on W. Mifflin Street with the opening reception on Friday September 26th. The show runs for 5 weeks – throughout SPE – until October 30th.

“Most of what we do is in the online space, but I’ve been thinking a lot lately about prints and how vital they are for we who love photography. There is an incredible amount of photographic talent here in the American Midwest and I’m thrilled to present some of these printed works in Wisconsin this fall.” — Andy Adams.

The Madison Museum of Contemporary Art will be screening the documentary about Alec Soth, “Somewhere to Disappear”, on Friday, September 26th at 7pm.

About FlakPhoto

FlakPhoto is an independent photo/arts collaborative that promotes the discovery of photographic image-makers from around the world. Since 2006 creator Andy Adams has staged exhibitions, publications and public conversations that foster photography culture on- and offline. FlakPhoto is based in Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Minneapolis – Mill City

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Wikipedia — Minneapolis grew up around Saint Anthony Falls, the highest waterfall on the Mississippi. In early years, forests in northern Minnesota were the source of a lumber industry that operated seventeen sawmills on power from the waterfall. By 1871, the west river bank had twenty-three businesses including flour mills, woolen mills, iron works, a railroad machine shop, and mills for cotton, paper, sashes, and planing wood.

Due to occupational hazards of milling, six local sources of artificial limbs were competing in the prosthetics business by the 1890s. The farmers of the Great Plains grew grain that was shipped by rail to the city’s thirty-four flour mills. Millers have used hydropower elsewhere since the 1st century B.C., but the results in Minneapolis between 1880 and 1930 were so remarkable the city has been described as “the greatest direct-drive waterpower center the world has ever seen.”

凯斯·泰勒

Handcrafted

Handcrafted

That’s my name in Chinese. At least I think it is. I hope it is… Anyway, I’m honoured to have been asked by Christina Anderson to contribute to this new Chinese publication titled HANDCRAFTED: The Art and Practice of the Handmade Print.

Edited by Sam Wang, Sandy King, Christina Z Anderson and Zhong Jianming, the book is published by Zhejiang Photographic Press Ltd.

The Print's the Thing*

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I couldn’t agree with these words from Andy Adams more. However, for me, I don’t feel an image is usually finished until I’ve made a print of it. Even with those images that exist solely on my website, perhaps taken with my iPhone as a record, I still feel the need to see them on paper because the tactility of the paper surface can change the entire experience.

I’ve been thinking about prints a lot lately – and how vital they are for we who love #photography. The Web is great but print LASTS. That’s going to be important for future historians who will likely grapple with all kinds of issues stemming from our early 21st century internet/photo culture.

 

This may be my most prized #photographic possession – a gift from the supremely talented photographer Keith Taylor. I enjoy it every day. It’s wonderful.

 

One of the reasons we’re doing the #FlakPhoto Midwest Print Show is to celebrate the tradition of #photo print-making and the joys of looking at analog pictures in person. The FMPS features 40+ Midwest photographers and opens September 26 in Madison, Wisconsin – I’ll announce our contributors this week. If you’re in the region I hope you’ll make the trip. More soon!

* Attributed to Irving Penn.