London

This summer’s been a pretty good one, but school’s started and it’s time for show and tell!

 

In July we flew back to London to see our daughter graduate from Central St Martins with a degree in Fashion Journalism, while at the same time our son and his girlfriend were heading in the opposite direction to Denver, CO, to start new jobs. So proud of them all!

 

Thanks for the photo, Jo!

For the three weeks that I was in the U.K., London was in the middle of a heatwave. I’m well old enough to remember the heatwave of ’76, which is the summer everyone compares hot weather to, but this was far hotter in my mind. Most days were in the mid-80s with a few in the low 90s. And remember, buses, tubes, houses and flats aren’t air-conditioned… But it was a good trip, seeing lots of friends, lots of museums and galleries and having so much fun staying with our daughter and her boyfriend in their new flat.

 

There were several outstanding photography shows — Vanessa Winship and Dorothea Lange, both at The Barbican, Tacita Dean’s Landscape at the Royal Academy and The Shape of Light at Tate Modern. A small show of work by C.R.W. Nevinson, Prints of War and Peaceat The British Museum commemorates his gift of 25 prints to the museum in 1918. They span his time in the trenches of Flanders as a war artist during World War I, as well as prints of New York, Paris and London.

 


C.R.W. Nevinson — Looking Through Brooklyn Bridge, New York, 1921, Drypoint

 


Ed Ruscha — Parking Lot series

 


Alison Rossiter — Gevaert Gevaluxe Velours

 

After three weeks of family, friends, art and walking, all sustained by copious amounts of flat whites, I returned to Minneapolis and went straight into teaching a week-long polymergravure workshop at Highpoint Center for Printmaking. And if that wasn’t enough, the following week I was teaching Kerik Kouklis the process. Kerik travelled to Minneapolis from California especially for a one-day, one-on-one workshop, at the end of which he had made 3 perfect plates and about a dozen prints!

 

If you’re interested in learning the process, sign up for my infrequent email newsletter for details of upcoming workshops.

 


© Kerik Kouklis

Photogravure Workshop

400.jpgFirst Prints

This past weekend I taught another 2.5-day workshop on the polymer photogravure process at Highpoint Center for Printmaking. Again, I was fortunate in having eight fantastic participants, most of whom happened to be photographers.

The first evening we looked at prints and discussed the kind of film output that is necessary for polymer photogravure and how it varies from the kind of film needed for other processes. We finished the evening by making the film positives using an Epson printer, ready to start making plates on the Saturday.

On Saturday morning I demonstrated the preparation of the plates, the two exposures – aquatint screen and film positive – and the processing. We also covered inking and wiping and how it differs from copperplate. Then they were on their own, making plates and printing, and even after just half a day’s hands-on experience the results were amazing; they were all producing very respectable prints. Sunday was spent working on other images, outputting more film, making new plates or experimenting with the same image using stiffer/looser inks or different papers.

So, thank you Regina Flanagan, Nancy A. Johnson, Carrie Shea, Martina Gates, Philip Anderson, Ashlin Mears, Claudia Danielson and Gina Dabrowski.

Photostock Kickstarter

Imagine a photographic artist’s retreat quietly situated in Michigan’s north woods where you can go and be educated in a number of photographic processes as well as utilize all the equipment needed to practice your art. A place where some of the finest in their field come to hold workshops and seminars far from the hustle of any city and only a short drive from one of the largest and most beautiful freshwater lakes in the world. Well, it’s already happening and with your help, it can get even better.

Cut to the chase. This Kickstarter project has reached the 90% mark very quickly and certainly deserves to reach its goal in the next few days. You’ll be hard pressed to find anyone as enthusiastic about promoting photography as Bill Schwab and it’s nice to see this project (hopefully) coming to fruition.